Science on TV – Having Your Say

Recall that I told you about the pilot for the upcoming show Wired Science in an earlier blog post. It airs today, (Wednesday, January 3) on PBS. It was made by KCET here in Los angeles, and as you may recall from the post, in August I learned some interesting things about the context in which the show sits. It is rather interesting. It’s all part of a head-to-head competition, or “experiment” as PBS are calling it.

You see, there are two other shows being piloted on PBS over the next couple of weeks too. One is Science Investigators, made by WGBH, Boston, and the other is 22nd Century, made by Towers Productions (I think). They are three different takes on a science TV show format. The casting, scripting, presentation… all these things vary a great deal.

They’re really trying to come up with newer, more accessible formats, with the aim of getting science out there to the general public. This is a great thing. Only one show will “win”, sadly. The prize is the go ahead to make more episodes, and have them air on PBS. The judges…. this is the important part… The Judges are YOU. Go to the PBS site and tell them what you think of the shows. Either wait until they air, or stream them directly from the site now and watch them on your computer. (More about the selection process in this article.) From the site:

Watch and Weigh In

Here’s the experiment: Throughout January, PBS will broadcast three new science programs. Only one program will become a regular science series on PBS. We want you to help us decide. Watch the programs on your PBS station or, beginning January 1st, visit the companion sites below to watch each pilot show. Then tell us what you think!

You get to have your say1 in how PBS shapes some of its science programming, and how programme-makers shape their future formats. Don’t miss the chance. It does not come along very often!

-cvj

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1Oh, and of course, it would be great to hear your opinions about the shows (and the process) here as well, in the comments. We can have quite an interesting discussion, I’m sure!

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